The weather forecast for Sunday says a high temperatures that could reach 50 — quite a change from the raging wind storms that killed two Virginians and at least five others — including two children — on Friday and Saturday.

Such has been the weather extremes of Winter 2018: Frigid, near-zero temperatures with wind chills even colder in January, Springlike days in February and cooler than normal days and nights so far in March with an outlook that shows the same for the next 10 days or so.

The front rain gutter at our house lays sprawled across out lawn like a large drunken snake, ripped from its mounting by the high winds.  Same for several trees — mostly poplars, around our abode.

Thankfully, the shingles — a set of architectural ones installed during replacement of our roof in 2013 — stay in place.  The weeping willow tree at the bottom of our front yard had bad hair days Friday and Saturday but should rebound as Spring and Summer approach.

Things could have been worse.  Our power went down at 2:18 a.m. Friday morning but our Generac automatic generator kicked in and ran flawlessly for 11 hours and 43 minutes until it came back on shortly before 2 p.m.

Interestingly Appalachian Power reported power restored two hours after it actually was and claimed the outage was 8 hours and 20 minutes in length — way off the mark.

Then, APCo sent another email saying power was out again at 8:20 p.m. Friday but our power was still on while the notice said:

  • We are working to assess the outage and identify the customers affected.
  • Our preliminary estimate for restoration is 3/04/18 at 11:59 PM.
  • APCo will send you an updated message as our crews provide additional or new information on this outage, such as the cause or when it might be restored.

A little more than an hour after that, we got another email that read:

Appalachian Power previously notified you of an outage in your area.

Our investigation of that outage shows your address is not out of power.

We knew that and we notified APCo more than an hour earlier that we still have power.

It has been that kind of winter.