Santa Claus takes requests for Christmas.

Santa arrives in Floyd this afternoon with a parade

'Tis the season to be jolly...or is that the season to be folly? Never mind. Watch the parade and welcome Santa.
Floyd Christmas Parade in 1965.

According to the National Weather Service office in Blacksburg, the rain in Floyd County this Sunday morning should end around 11 a.m. with a high temperature of around 58 and clear for the annual Christmas parade that begins at 3 p.m. The temperature stood at 50 degrees at 0600 this morning at our house, with rain falling.

History tells us that the first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is in 1924 also started the tradition of a parade ending with the arrival of Santa in the United States but Toronto’s annual Santa Claus Parade dates back tp 1904.

Wikipedia says the Christmas parade is descended tom “medieval and renaissance revivals form ancient Rome:

The Christmas parade is a direct descendant of late Medieval and Renaissance revivals of Roman Triumphs, which had music and banners, wagons filled with the spoils of war, and climaxed with the dux riding in a chariot, preferably drawn by two horses, and thus called the biga. (A quadriga such as surmounts the Brandenburg Gate is drawn by four horses.) Similarly, the climax of a Santa Claus parade is always Santa in his sleigh, drawn by eight reindeer (an octigia). Roman Triumphs were themselves consciously modeled on ceremonies honoring the gods. The Santa Claus parade directly corresponds to the modern triumphal entry of Santa Claus.

And Santa Claus? The History Channel reports:

St. Nicholas made his first inroads into American popular culture towards the end of the 18th century. In December 1773, and again in 1774, a New York newspaper reported that groups of Dutch families had gathered to honor the anniversary of his death.

The name Santa Claus evolved from Nick’s Dutch nickname, Sinter Klaas, a shortened form of Sint Nikolaas (Dutch for Saint Nicholas). In 1804, John Pintard, a member of the New York Historical Society, distributed woodcuts of St. Nicholas at the society’s annual meeting. The background of the engraving contains now-familiar Santa images including stockings filled with toys and fruit hung over a fireplace. 

In 1809, Washington Irving helped to popularize the Sinter Klaas stories when he referred to St. Nicholas as the patron saint of New York in his book, The History of New York. As his prominence grew, Sinter Klaas was described as everything from a “rascal” with a blue three-cornered hat, red waistcoat, and yellow stockings to a man wearing a broad-brimmed hat and a “huge pair of Flemish trunk hose.”

Gift-giving, mainly centered around children, has been an important part of the Christmas celebration since the holiday’s rejuvenation in the early 19th century. Stores began to advertise Christmas shopping in 1820, and by the 1840s, newspapers were creating separate sections for holiday advertisements, which often featured images of the newly-popular Santa Claus. 

In 1841, thousands of children visited a Philadelphia shop to see a life-size Santa Claus model. It was only a matter of time before stores began to attract children, and their parents, with the lure of a peek at a “live” Santa Claus. In the early 1890s, the Salvation Army needed money to pay for the free Christmas meals they provided to needy families. They began dressing up unemployed men in Santa Claus suits and sending them into the streets of New York to solicit donations. Those familiar Salvation Army Santas have been ringing bells on the street corners of American cities ever since.

Have fun at the parade and Merry Christmas.

© 2004-2022 Blue Ridge Muse

© 2021 Blue Ridge Muse